A topical dermatitis is a very common, often chronic (long-lasting) skin disease that affects a large percentage of the world’s population. It is also called eczema, dermatitis, or atopy. The atopic dermatitis triad includes asthma, allergies (hay fever), and eczema. The hallmarks of the disease include skin rashes and itching.

The word “dermatitis” means inflammation of the skin. In a topical dermatitis, the skin becomes extremely itchy and inflamed, causing redness, swelling, cracking, weeping, crusting, and scaling. Multiple factors can trigger or worsen atopic dermatitis, including dry skin, seasonal allergies, exposure to harsh soaps and detergents, new skin products or creams, and cold weather. What is the difference between atopic dermatitis and eczema?

Eczema is used as a general term for many types of skin inflammation (dermatitis) and allergic-type skin rashes. There are different types of eczema, like allergic, contact, irritant, and nummular eczema.

Stasis dermatitis: a skin irritation on the lower legs, generally related to circulatory problems and congestion of the leg veins.

There is no known cure for a topical dermatitis (eczema). There is, however, ongoing research and very effective treatments.  If the eczema has failed to respond to topical treatments or is too severe for topical treatment alone, ultraviolet light (phototherapy) may be helpful.   Oral medications may be offered to those with severe or treatment-resistant eczema.

A topical dermatitis (eczema) is an itchy inflammation of your skin. Self-care measures, such as avoiding soaps or other irritants and applying creams or ointments, can help relieve itching. If the eczema has failed to respond to topical treatments or is too severe for topical treatment alone, ultraviolet light (phototherapy) may be helpful. Phototherapy is not suitable for everyone due to practical difficulties (such as travel or immobility) or photosensitivity.

Filed under: Environment Allergy

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